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eczema moisturiser

Shea butter fun facts

Another one of our star products here at Itchy Baby Co is the divine and luxurious shea butter.

Shea butter is super moisturising and hydrating thanks to its high content of fatty acids which lock in moisture and help the skin hold on to it for longer. It’s also rich in vitamins, A, B, C, D, E and F, all of which help to keep skin healthy and are intensively moisturising.

Basically, this lovely little ingredient is a good egg.  You’ll find shea butter in our famous eczema moisturiser.

Fun facts about shea butter:

  • Cleopatra apparently loved shea butter. There is a mention of caravans of clay jars filled with shea butter for her use. It’s also said that this luxurious ingredient was beloved by the Queen of Sheba and Nefertiti. So, you’re in good company!
  • Shea butter is ivory in colour and is made by crushing and boiling the nuts from the shea tree.
  • The shea tree grows in 19 African countries, in the Savannah’s of west and central Africa.
  • Untreated shea butter should have a subtle yet pleasant aroma. If your baby suffers with eczema, you’ll know straight away that highly perfumed products are often a trigger for flare-up. Our high-quality shea butter has a mild scent that is a little bit nutty / earthy, guaranteed to please those with sensitive skin and noses!
  • Shea butter offers natural UV protection (it is SPF 6) but it is NOT a substitute for sunscreen. We’d still always recommend using your own sunscreen.
  • It contains 60% fat, making it highly emollient – perfect for sensitive skin or those with eczema.
  • Shea butter can also be used to reduce inflammation. A 2010 study found that due to its cinnamic acid and other natural properties, shea butter was anti-inflammatory. One compound in particular, lupeol cinnamate, was found to reduce skin inflammation and even potentially help avoid skin mutations. This also makes it beneficial for some people with acne.
  • The antioxidant activity of certain active compounds in shea butter, such as linolenic and linoleic acid can help to prevent oxidative stress in the skin, which can reduce the likelihood of wrinkles, age spots, and other signs of premature aging.

Want to know more?

Like reading about our all-natural ingredients? Check out our latest post featuring our star ingredient, colloidal oatmeal!

This blog post was brought to you and your child with love and care by Julia and the itchy baby co. team x

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

helping my child's dry skin

My child has dry skin – what can I do to keep their skin healthy?

Dry skin is an uncomfortable condition where the skin becomes itchy, scaly and starts to crack. Looking after your child’s skin may take a lot of time and can be stressful, especially seeing them in pain from scratching so much. It can happen for a number of reasons, but it is important to remember that managing dry skin by using effective skincare products in a regular skincare routine will help keep your child’s skin healthy. With some children dry skin can be harmless, but for others if the skin is not regularly moisturised, it can trigger skin irritation, itchy skin and eczema.

What can cause my child’s skin to become dry?
  • Cold weather – Skin tends to be driest in winter, because of the dry air, cold temperatures and low humidity, making dry skin and eczema flare ups common. Using heaters and fireplaces during winter may also contribute to low humidity and drying of the skin.
  • Hot weather – During hot weather, your child will sweat more to try and regulate their body temperature, causing water loss from their body and drying out their skin. This can break down the skin’s natural barrier, making it harder to keep bacteria and irritants away from the body and increase the risk of infection.
  • Harsh soaps and detergents – Many available soaps, detergents and shampoos contain harsh chemicals that help remove oil from the skin, but can also strip the skin of moisture.

Where on the body is dry skin common?

Most dry skin is caused by environmental factors such as weather, low humidity and having showers and baths where the water is too hot. Hands, arms, and legs are the most common areas of the body to become dry. In most instances, dry skin can be managed using an intensive moisturiser.

What does dry skin look like?

  • Flaking, itching, peeling and scaling of the skin
  • Dullness and redness of the skin
  • Rough patches on the skin
  • Grey, ashy skin with cracks that if left untreated can bleed

What can I do to help my child’s skin?

Using a hydrating as well as cleansing bath soak to add moisture into your child’s skin during bath time will add moisture into the skin and coat the skin to prevent water loss. When you take your child out of the bath gently pat their skin without drying it completely. Then moisturise immediately while their skin is still a bit damp. Moisturise their skin again in the morning to protect it during the day.  Choosing to moisturise their skin with an ointment, like our itchy baby co. moisturiser, rather than a cream or lotion will work better for dry skin. This is because it stays on the skin for longer to lock in hydration and stop water escaping from the skin’s surface.

 

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love and care from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

eczema child

Why does my child have eczema

Eczema is a common condition with one in five babies in Australia having eczema, but why do some babies get it and others don’t? It  is more likely to affect babies who are born into families with a history of eczema, asthma and hayfever. In our family my husband has eczema and hay fever, and I’m not completely blameless having had asthma as a child. Children with eczema are also more likely to also develop asthma and hayfever, but these are not caused by eczema. The bottom line is eczema is passed onto our babies in our genes.

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moisturising and eczema

Tips for moisturising your baby’s eczema skin

Through the years of battling with my little one’s eczema I have learnt the difficult lesson of just how important it is to keep eczema skin nourished, hydrated and moisturised. It’s so easy in amongst our busy days to forget to moisturise our little one’s skin and all our hard work of finding suitable products and running around to see pharmacists, doctors and specialists goes out the window.

Scratching only makes eczema worse so here are some tips on moisturising your little one’s eczema skin which hopefully will help you get you on top of managing eczema.

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