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Can sweating cause eczema flare-ups?

Here in Australia we’re blessed with beautiful sunny days and clear skies, and whilst that makes for a great outdoor lifestyle, it can play havoc with sensitive skin.

Heat is a common eczema trigger and heat also equals sweat. Your child will sweat more in warmer weather as they try to regulate their body temperature. Many people with eczema become itchy or experience a “prickly heat” sensation when they sweat, which is very uncomfortable.

Sweat contains mainly water, which takes all the moisture out of the skin, causing dryness and irritation. This environment attracts bacteria which further inflames the skin. Sweat also has a very small amount of sodium, potassium, calcium, magnesium and zinc which can also further irritate your poor bubs skin.

You may have noticed that the areas of the body where moisture accumulates most, such as the insides of the elbows, back of the knees and around the neck, tend to be hot spots for eczema rashes.

There are two types of sweat glands in the body that help with the sweating process. These are eccrine and apocrine glands. There are occasions when the opening of these ducts become occluded, especially in hot weather. This can lead to miliaria, a type of rash that commonly occurs on the back and can be itchy.

Management of your child’s eczema is crucial in the hotter months, and as always, prevention is better than treatment when it comes to flare ups. Try to keep your child as cool as possible on hot days. Carry a handheld fan where possible to cool the skin and get rid of any residual sweat. Dress them in light, cotton clothes that help wick away moisture and keep them in the shade where possible.

Make sure sweat doesn’t stay on your child’s body – wipe and dry the skin with cool water when necessary. If you do wash the skin, re-apply some eczema moisturiser or sunscreen straight away, to lock the moisture back in.  Keep your little one hydrated by getting them to drink lots of water throughout the day.

Here are some great tips on managing your baby’s eczema in hotter weather.

This post was brought to you and your baby with love by Julia and the Itchy Baby Co. team. X

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

heat and eczema

Why does heat make eczema worse?

We’re coming into Summer which means beach days and picnics. We love being outdoors and enjoying the sunshine, but we also know it can make eczema symptoms worse.

You may have a great management plan in place throughout Winter and Autumn, but as the heat increases, you may find you need to re-think your approach. It turns out hot weather is one of the most common trigger of eczema, especially in children, so you might notice your little one’s eczema more during Summer than Winter.

How does heat trigger eczema?

Heat causes water loss which dries out the skin. Dryness breaks down the skin’s natural barrier which can then no longer protect it from irritants and toxins, allowing them to get into the skin and cause damage. Hot temperatures can also make us sweat. Not only does sweat take all the moisture out of the skin, but it also brings any irritants to the surface where they can aggravate and inflame the skin.

What does heat do to eczema skin?

  • Dries out the skin which makes it a nice place for bacteria to live and irritate the skin.
  • Makes the skin red which causes itching.
  • Breaks down the skin’s natural barrier so irritants can more easily get in.
  • Causes sweating which makes the skin damp and takes away moisture.
  • There is also a study which concludes that people with eczema don’t get rid of the heat from their bodies as well as those without eczema which triggers itching, redness and inflammation.

How can you prevent flare-ups in the heat?

  • Loose fitting cotton clothing is least likely to trap heat around your little one’s body during warmer months. Layering what you put on your little one will let you take off one layer as the weather heats up throughout the day. This is especially important when you’re travelling in the car. Dress for car travel, rather than your destination.
  • Night time heat can trigger eczema too, so avoiding thick pyjamas and doonas which can trap heat is really important. Try using a cotton sheet and cotton blankets instead of a doona and removing a blanket on warm nights.
  • Regular bathing of your little one with eczema has two benefits. It removes irritants from the skin’s surface which can cause itching and inflammation and it is the most effective way to put moisture back into the skin. Using itchy baby co bath soaks in the bath will leave a thin film on the skin which acts as a barrier to trap moisture to stop the skin from drying out and they also have anti-inflammatory and anti-itch properties.
  • Moisturising immediately after taking your little one out of the bath and while the skin is still damp will lock in hydration to the skin and help to protect the skin’s natural barrier. Moisturising can also reduce the temperature of the skin which helps to prevent it from drying out. Our eczema moisturiser is made with 100% natural ingredients and has soothing colloidal oatmeal, shea butter and vitamin E, which help protect your child’s skin.
  • Using a cold compress on eczema skin can be a good way to lower the skin’s temperature and help to manage itching. To make a cold compress use a clean washcloth which has been soaked in cold water. Rest it on the skin for a few minutes to take the heat out and repeat until the skin has cooled down.

This post was brought to you and your baby with love by Julia and the Itchy Baby Co. team. X

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

eczema moisturiser

Shea butter fun facts

Another one of our star products here at Itchy Baby Co is the divine and luxurious shea butter.

Shea butter is super moisturising and hydrating thanks to its high content of fatty acids which lock in moisture and help the skin hold on to it for longer. It’s also rich in vitamins, A, B, C, D, E and F, all of which help to keep skin healthy and are intensively moisturising.

Basically, this lovely little ingredient is a good egg.  You’ll find shea butter in our famous eczema moisturiser.

Fun facts about shea butter:

  • Cleopatra apparently loved shea butter. There is a mention of caravans of clay jars filled with shea butter for her use. It’s also said that this luxurious ingredient was beloved by the Queen of Sheba and Nefertiti. So, you’re in good company!
  • Shea butter is ivory in colour and is made by crushing and boiling the nuts from the shea tree.
  • The shea tree grows in 19 African countries, in the Savannah’s of west and central Africa.
  • Untreated shea butter should have a subtle yet pleasant aroma. If your baby suffers with eczema, you’ll know straight away that highly perfumed products are often a trigger for flare-up. Our high-quality shea butter has a mild scent that is a little bit nutty / earthy, guaranteed to please those with sensitive skin and noses!
  • Shea butter offers natural UV protection (it is SPF 6) but it is NOT a substitute for sunscreen. We’d still always recommend using your own sunscreen.
  • It contains 60% fat, making it highly emollient – perfect for sensitive skin or those with eczema.
  • Shea butter can also be used to reduce inflammation. A 2010 study found that due to its cinnamic acid and other natural properties, shea butter was anti-inflammatory. One compound in particular, lupeol cinnamate, was found to reduce skin inflammation and even potentially help avoid skin mutations. This also makes it beneficial for some people with acne.
  • The antioxidant activity of certain active compounds in shea butter, such as linolenic and linoleic acid can help to prevent oxidative stress in the skin, which can reduce the likelihood of wrinkles, age spots, and other signs of premature aging.

Want to know more?

Like reading about our all-natural ingredients? Check out our latest post featuring our star ingredient, colloidal oatmeal!

This blog post was brought to you and your child with love and care by Julia and the itchy baby co. team x

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

Colloidal oatmeal and eczema

Colloidal oatmeal and eczema

What is colloidal oatmeal?

Whenever we’re asked about our products and our journey to creating Itchy Baby Co, there’s one ingredient we just can’t praise highly enough – colloidal oatmeal.

Colloidal oatmeal may sound fancy, but it’s just good old-fashioned oats, finely ground down to create a soft powder, which can be easily suspended in water or creams. Being absorbed easily allows eczema skin to benefit from the protective, moisturising, anti-inflammatory properties of oats more easily and effectively than if they had not been finely milled. It’s super-soothing, non-irritating and is packed with antioxidants – so it’s no wonder that it’s the number one ingredient in all of our products.

How does colloidal oatmeal work such magic?

  • Oatmeal holds a large amount of water because it’s packed full of starches and beta-glucans, this helps protect and hydrate the skin
  • It has a high number of saponins, so it’s perfect for cleansing sensitive skin
  • Oatmeal is full of cellulose and fibre, so it leaves your baby’s skin super-soft and nourished
  • Oatmeal has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity through its many types of phenols
  • Studies have shown that colloidal oatmeal binds to the skin and provides a protective barrier against irritants.
  • It also contains water-binding polysaccharides and hydrocolloids that hold moisture against the skin allowing it to act as an emollient

Why don’t I need to use soap and other cleansing products with colloidal oatmeal?

Colloidal oatmeal has natural cleansing properties which come about because of a feature in its chemical structure called saponins. This means the skin is being cleansed while it is also soaking up all of the other properties which can help to manage eczema and reduce eczema flare ups. There’s no need to use another cleansing product such as a body wash, and definitely stay away from soaps and bubble bath which can dry out and irritate the skin triggering an eczema flare up.

How often should I bathe in colloidal oatmeal for eczema?

We recommend bathing in a colloidal oatmeal bath once a day as part of your skin care routine in managing eczema. Bathing in colloidal oatmeal will not only allow the skin to benefit from its moisturising, anti-inflammatory and soothing properties, but also wash triggers away from the skin which can cause irritation and sometimes lead to infection. Bath time should be kept to a maximum of ten minutes in lukewarm water and there’s more tips on the best way to bath a child with eczema here.

Soak it up

Our natural oatmeal bath soaks are a great example of colloidal oatmeal at its best.

We started our range with our oatmeal bath soak, which is 100% oatmeal and nothing else! This is still one of our most popular products, however if you like to mix-up your ingredients a bit, we do also now offer a range of combination soaks which combine a number of gorgeous, skin-loving ingredients with the good old colloidal oatmeal.

Enjoy the best of both worlds with this soak; you get the protective benefits of oatmeal, with ultra-moisturising, vitamin-rich ‘goat’s’ milk.

This soak combines our star ingredient, oatmeal, along with highly moisturising ‘goat’s’ milk and moisturising coconut oil. This soak is highly moisturising and adds a tropical lushness to bath time!

Marshmallow root is so great for soothing the skin, so we’ve combined it with our favourite oatmeal to offer a super hydrating, easily absorbed bath soak.

This blog post was brought to you and your child with love and care by Julia and the itchy baby co. team x

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

is eczema hereditary?

Is eczema hereditary?

We still don’t know what actually causes eczema, and there are so many variations that it can sometimes take a while to even narrow down which type you’re dealing with in the first place! The latest thinking is that eczema is caused by a combination of factors, including:

  • Genetics
  • Abnormal function of the immune system
  • Environment
  • Activities that may cause skin to be more sensitive
  • Defects in the skin barrier that allow moisture out and germs in

So, is it hereditary?

Eczema certainly seems to run in families, so that suggests a genetic role in eczema’s development. A major risk factor is having a relative who has or has had eczema, asthma or seasonal allergies such as hay fever.

I have eczema, does this mean my child will?

Not necessarily. Lots of adults with eczema go on to have kids with no skin issues at all. Similarly, some children will develop symptoms when both parents seem to be eczema-free. If you do suffer from eczema or asthma, or have particularly bad allergies, keep an eye on your child’s skin. They may be more predisposed to eczema, so it’s a good idea to seek treatment as early as possible. It’s always better to treat eczema as soon as the sensitivity and itching begins – that way you can prevent some of the more severe reactions.

Preventative care

We have a range of gentle and natural solutions for those with sensitive skin, so it may be worth using these instead of normal children’s bubble baths which have a lot of harsh chemicals in them. If you do notice an issue with your baby’s skin, make sure you go and see a GP straight away. There are many kinds of eczema, all of which require slightly different treatments.

Using our bath soaks every night will help keen skin soft and hydrated, even if your child doesn’t suffer from eczema! It’s a great way to soothe any general itchy or dry skin and prevent breakouts for those little ones with sensitive skin.

Mum guilt

Don’t feel guilty if you have eczema and your child develops it too. It’s a very common issue for many, many children. Focus on creating a management plan for your bub so breakouts are less often and less severe. If you want to know more, check out some of our other blog posts – we’ve got lots of great tips on how to prevent toddler flare-ups, advice for managing eczema in hotter months and practising self-care if your child is diagnosed with eczema.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

summer can cause eczema flare ups

Ten ways to help your baby’s eczema in the heat of Summer

The heat of Summer can trigger eczema flare ups and if the temperature, weather and climate trigger your child’s eczema, this time of year can be really challenging. Here a few tips to help get you through the heat of Summer when your child has eczema and itchy, dry skin and hopefully lessen flare ups and soothe the itch.

  • Keep drinking water as well as eating hydrating foods

Keeping your child’s fluids going will lower their core body temperature which means they will stay cooler and there will be less heat in the body to travel to the surface of the skin. Once heat gets to the surface of eczema skin it becomes trapped and doesn’t escape from the body as easily. This makes the skin, hot, itchy and bothered. Ice blocks are also a great way to increase fluids and also the coldness is a bonus. Being aware of hydrating foods and increasing these in your child’s diet can also help.

  • Store your moisturiser in the fridge during Summer

Sticking to your regular skincare routine to keep the skin nourished and strengthen the skin’s barrier is so important through Summer. Storing your moisturiser in the fridge so it’s refreshing when applied to the skin and has a cooling sensation is a must during Summer.

  • Use a cool compresses on the skin

Hot skin is itchy skin and so much of the body’s heat is trapped at the skin’s surface. Taking away the heat at the surface of the skin can reduce the need to itch and stop the itch, scratch cycle in its tracks.

  • Wear loose, cotton clothing

The skin needs to breathe to be able to keep cool. Cotton is a breathable fabric and wearing loose clothing means the heat doesn’t get trapped at the surface of the skin causing itch and irritation.

  • Patch test sunscreens and find one which is suitable for your child’s skin

Finding a suitable sunscreen when your child has eczema is often a case of trial and error. Patch test first before applying to the entire body and be aware of the ingredients. Often natural zinc sunscreens cause less irritation for eczema skin.

  • Soak a singlet in cool water, wring it out and wear it

This idea is particularly good if you have just come home from being out in the heat of the day because it is a quick way to decrease the body’s core temperature and take away surface heat from the skin. When you take the singlet off moisturise the skin straight away.

  • Cool baths with itchy baby co bath soak

Cool baths will bring relief to the skin’s surface and also not raise the body’s core temperature. Adding itchy baby co bath soak to the bath will cleanse the skin taking away any irritants sitting on the skin’s surface and also add moisture, hydration and nourishment to the skin.

  • Swimming in both salt and chlorine can reduce bacteria on the skin

Bacteria loves dry skin and skin infections are very common with eczema. Both salt and chlorine can reduce the amount of bacteria sitting on the surface of the skin, which is just waiting for a vigorous scratch to break the skin’s surface and jump in and cause infection. Just make sure you rinse the skin straight after swimming and apply moisturiser.

  • Play in the shade to lessen sweat

This will help to lessen any sweat which when it sits on the skin can cause irritation. If your child gets sweaty gently dab off any sweat sitting on the skin’s surface.

  • Sleep cool in cotton pyjamas and use only cotton bedding

Sleeping in cotton pyjamas and making sure your child isn’t sleeping under too much bedding will let the skin breathe and stop heat being trapped at the skin’s surface which will hopefully lead to a better night’s sleep.

 

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

Can stress make your child's eczema flare up?

Is stress a trigger for my child’s eczema?

Stress. Why is it that on the days my little boy went to daycare his skin always seemed worse? So many people told me it was the sandpit, but it even on the days there was no sandpit play his skin was still affected. So what was causing his eczema to flare up while he was at daycare?

After a lot of monitoring all sorts of possible triggers, like whether he played in the sandpit that day or not, analysing the weekly weekly menu to try and pick up a pattern, taking note of whether it was a hot or cold day, and making sure his own sunscreen was applied which I knew didn’t irritate his skin… I wasn’t able to find a culprit.

There was one possibility left. And this was stress. The emotional stress of being in a less familiar environment, being away from me, and dealing with the everyday happenings at daycare was quite possibly the reason for his eczema flare ups.

What types of stress triggers eczema?

  • Separation anxiety – When your child is away from you for long periods of time, it may cause them mental and emotional distress and result in their skin being more itchy.
  • The stress scratch cycle – When your child feels stressed from irritants such as clothing and dust, they may begin to scratch their skin intensely.
  • Busy schedules – Just like all of us, when schedules get more hectic, we start to feel stressed and begin to worry. Children also feel this when their routines become overloaded or changed, so it is important to maintain a more relaxed routine for your little one and sometimes choose to do less.

How can I manage my child’s stress?

There are some changes you could make which could help to lessen eczema flare ups related to stress.

Itchy skin can make sleeping well really challenging and the lack of sleep can result in your child feeling stressed, worsening eczema symptoms. To help your little one (and you) get a good night’s sleep you could try:

  • Bath time can help some children relax, especially if it is part of their known routine.
  • After the bath massage their skin using a hydrating moisturiser or oil to protect the skin from drying out and getting itchy during the night.
  • Limit the use of screen time two hours before bed time.
  • Make sure your child’s bedroom is a relaxed environment – not too hot or cold. It is also important to dress your child up in pyjamas made of cotton which is a breathable fabric and lessens the heat around the body which can cause itchiness.

Although stress may not directly cause eczema, it can increase the incidence of eczema flare ups. Just being aware of stress as a trigger for your child’s eczema can influence decisions you make about your day to day routine.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

are pets good for children who have eczema?

What type of pets are good for children who have eczema?

Can children with eczema have pets?

We all love pets, especially children. They are a great way of passing time and having fun, while at the same time helping your child learn responsibility. Choosing a family pet when your child has eczema has comes with extra considerations, this is because pet dander and other allergens or irritants can potentially trigger eczema and aggravate flare ups.

Which pets can trigger eczema?

Any animal that sheds pet dander has the potential to trigger eczema flare ups in your child. Dander is material shed from the body of various animals that have fur, hair, or feathers. You may have heard of ‘hypoallergenic pets’ being better for your eczema child, however there is no proof that these animals are better for children with allergies because all pets have the potential to transfer dander and saliva to your child.

Research on pets and eczema

Studies conducted by Epstein, which was featured in ‘The Journal of Paediatrics’ showed that dog ownership among young children who tested positive for dog allergies, decreased the risk of developing eczema when they are older. Six hundred and thirty six children at risk of developing allergies, living in Cincinnati were collected and results showed that those with dogs were less likely to develop allergies compared to those who did not own a dog.  Doctors call this the hygiene hypothesis, where the theory is that being exposed to germs when a child is young strengthens the immune system.

Although research found this data for dogs, there was not very much information on whether cats act the same way. Studies showed that children who owned a cat before the age of one, who were also tested positive for allergies, were much more likely to develop atopic eczema than those who did not have a cat. If your child is allergic to cats, living with one may make them more likely to get eczema flare ups. Experts say that more investigations need to be administered on the positives and negatives of owning different pets while you have a child with atopic eczema.

According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, eczema flare ups can worsen with triggers such as allergens and pet dander (pet saliva, urine or skin flakes), and not always just the pet’s fur. Since research is still not 100% conclusive, it may be safe to expand your options and buy a pet with no fur instead (maybe a goldfish?). You can also spend time with the pet you are considering buying and see if your child’s symptoms worsen, and then make a decision.

Tips for living with a pet

If you suspect that your pet is aggravating your child’s eczema, here are some tips to help minimise flare ups:

  • Vacuum and dust regularly to get rid of pet dander and fur, as well as any dust mites that might be roaming around
  • Keep your pet out of bedrooms
  • Wash the pet bedding routinely
  • Bathe and groom your pet regularly to get rid of allergens that may be on them. It is best to do it outside to minimise contact with your child.
  • Make sure to wash your child’s hands after they have finished playing with the pets. Regular bath time is important to cleanse the skin especially after your child has come into contact with irritants and allergens.
  • Always remember to moisturise to keep the skin soft and hydrated!

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

eczema colloidal oatmeal bath itchy dry skin

It’s just OATMEAL! How can an oatmeal bath help my child’s itchy, dry, eczema skin?

I know, I get it, and I thought the exact same thing – oatmeal is oatmeal. How is it going to help my child’s itchy, dry, eczema skin? So to satisfy my scientific pharmacist self, I started researching the clinical evidence and research available (that kept me busy for awhile!) and after those late night study sessions, I decided to jump right in. Or rather… I stepped into the oatmeal bath carefully holding my little boy and hoping with every bit of my heart and soul for something to wash away the pain of his suffering and ease my guilt.

Why can an oatmeal bath be effective for eczema and dry, itchy skin?

Naturally, the benefits of an oatmeal bath go back to science…

Research shows most of the benefits of having an oatmeal bath come from oatmeal’s chemical structure:

  • Beta-glucans hold in water and protect the skin, and may also assist in stimulating collagen production to strengthen the skin from irritation.
  • Cellulose and fibre which give oatmeal the ability to soften and moisturise the skin.
  • Phenols which have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, helping reduce irritation and itching of your child’s eczema skin.
  • Our body contains prostaglandins which cause blood vessels to dilate, resulting in inflamed, irritated skin that can be prone to infection by bacteria and other microorganisms.
  • Colloidal oatmeal lowers the levels of prostaglandins, resulting in repaired barrier function and calmed skin.
  • Saponins, which are compounds found mainly in grains, and this ingredient gives colloidal oatmeal exceptional cleansing qualities to wash the skin and also take away any triggers sitting on the skin’s surface which can cause irritation and lead to infection.

Is using oatmeal for eczema and itchy, dry skin a new thing?

No! Oatmeal has been used for hundreds of years to soothe itchy and irritated skin. The oldest oat grains were found in Egypt in about 2000 BC and was introduced to North America at the beginning of the 17th century. Colloidal oatmeal started to be used for cosmetic benefits in facial masks as well as for cleansing and relieving itching. In the mid 1900s, colloidal oatmeal became ready to use for skin care and in 2003, the US FDA approved it as a product that can relieve skin irritation and itching.

What new evidence is around to suggest colloidal oatmeal might be effective for my child’s eczema?

Studies have been conducted on colloidal oatmeal, as it has been used for centuries as a topical treatment for a range of skin conditions, including eczema. Extracts of colloidal oatmeal were made with numerous solvents and tested in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory assays. A blind study was also carried out with 29 healthy females who displayed mild to moderate itch with dry skin on their lower legs. After treatment with colloidal oatmeal, results showed significant clinical improvements in skin dryness, roughness and the magnitude of itchiness. These results provided evidence that colloidal oatmeal does contribute to anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, benefiting the skin, and may be used to treat the symptoms of eczema (Reynertson KA et al., 2018; PubMed 2018).

In a double blind, active-controlled study researchers aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 1% colloidal oatmeal cream, compared to prescription creams in children with eczema. A variety of ages (ranging from 6 months to 18 years old) were randomised to colloidal oatmeal and prescription cream. The effectiveness of these products was tested using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) scores, as well as the Investigator’s Global Atopic Dermatitis Assessment (IGADA) scores. The EASI scores showed that prescription cream was not superior to colloidal oatmeal. It was concluded that 1% oatmeal cream was equally effective and safe as the prescription cream, in the treatment of mild-moderate eczema in children (Lisante Et Al., 2017; Medline, 2018).

Another double-blind, randomised, controlled study was conducted by researches where colloidal oatmeal was applied for 15 minutes as an open patch test, and under a patch for 24-48 hours. Results showed no sign of an allergic reaction. In a 2-week, single-blinded study of patients with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-VI, a remarkable improvement in skin brightness was seen within the first day, and continued throughout the study period. These results concluded that using the moisturiser containing colloidal oatmeal twice daily had great improvements in alleviating symptoms of irritated skin (Nebus et al., 2004).

But what is colloidal oatmeal?

When we hear oatmeal bath, it may sound like having a bath with breakfast cereal, but it is not quite what we think.  Oatmeal is ground into a fine powder and boiled, making it into a colloid, which is a solution of very small particles suspended in warm water, and because it has been finely ground, it remains evenly dispersed and does not sink to the bottom. This well mixed oatmeal is called colloidal oatmeal. Colloidal oatmeal binds to the skin and forms a protective barrier which helps to lock in moisture, as well as ease inflammation, it also cleanses the skin.

Where can I find colloidal oatmeal to help my child’s eczema and itchy, dry skin?

Our itchy baby co. products contain colloidal oatmeal. A regular skincare routine of bathing and moisturising your child every day can lead to healthy and happy skin.We recommend dissolving two to three spoonfuls of our natural oatmeal bath soak in a lukewarm bath every day and applying our oatmeal and coconut moisturiser within two minutes of taking your child out of the bath.  You can find a range of natural skincare products containing oatmeal oatmeal at itchy baby co.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

References:

Lisante, T., Nunez, C., and Zhang, P. (2017). Efficacy and safety of an over-the-counter 1% colloidal oatmeal cream in the management of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in children: a double blind, randomised, active-controlled study. Journal of Dermatological Treatment 28: 659-667
Renertson, KA. et al. (2015). Anti-inflammatory activities of colloidal oatmeal (Avena sativa) contribute to the effectiveness of oats in treatment of itch associated with dry skin.  J Drugs Dermatol. 14 (1): 43-48. PubMed-NCBI
Nebus J, et al. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004;50:P77.
Gibson L, et al. (2003) Origin, history, and uses of oat (Avena sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum).

helping my child's dry skin

My child has dry skin – what can I do to keep their skin healthy?

Dry skin is an uncomfortable condition where the skin becomes itchy, scaly and starts to crack. Looking after your child’s skin may take a lot of time and can be stressful, especially seeing them in pain from scratching so much. It can happen for a number of reasons, but it is important to remember that managing dry skin by using effective skincare products in a regular skincare routine will help keep your child’s skin healthy. With some children dry skin can be harmless, but for others if the skin is not regularly moisturised, it can trigger skin irritation, itchy skin and eczema.

What can cause my child’s skin to become dry?
  • Cold weather – Skin tends to be driest in winter, because of the dry air, cold temperatures and low humidity, making dry skin and eczema flare ups common. Using heaters and fireplaces during winter may also contribute to low humidity and drying of the skin.
  • Hot weather – During hot weather, your child will sweat more to try and regulate their body temperature, causing water loss from their body and drying out their skin. This can break down the skin’s natural barrier, making it harder to keep bacteria and irritants away from the body and increase the risk of infection.
  • Harsh soaps and detergents – Many available soaps, detergents and shampoos contain harsh chemicals that help remove oil from the skin, but can also strip the skin of moisture.

Where on the body is dry skin common?

Most dry skin is caused by environmental factors such as weather, low humidity and having showers and baths where the water is too hot. Hands, arms, and legs are the most common areas of the body to become dry. In most instances, dry skin can be managed using an intensive moisturiser.

What does dry skin look like?

  • Flaking, itching, peeling and scaling of the skin
  • Dullness and redness of the skin
  • Rough patches on the skin
  • Grey, ashy skin with cracks that if left untreated can bleed

What can I do to help my child’s skin?

Using a hydrating as well as cleansing bath soak to add moisture into your child’s skin during bath time will add moisture into the skin and coat the skin to prevent water loss. When you take your child out of the bath gently pat their skin without drying it completely. Then moisturise immediately while their skin is still a bit damp. Moisturise their skin again in the morning to protect it during the day.  Choosing to moisturise their skin with an ointment, like our itchy baby co. moisturiser, rather than a cream or lotion will work better for dry skin. This is because it stays on the skin for longer to lock in hydration and stop water escaping from the skin’s surface.

 

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love and care from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.