• FREE shipping to Australia on all orders
  • FREE shipping to New Zealand on orders $50+

Posts

Can stress make your child's eczema flare up?

Is stress a trigger for my child’s eczema?

Stress. Why is it that on the days my little boy went to daycare his skin always seemed worse? So many people told me it was the sandpit, but it even on the days there was no sandpit play his skin was still affected. So what was causing his eczema to flare up while he was at daycare?

After a lot of monitoring all sorts of possible triggers, like whether he played in the sandpit that day or not, analysing the weekly weekly menu to try and pick up a pattern, taking note of whether it was a hot or cold day, and making sure his own sunscreen was applied which I knew didn’t irritate his skin… I wasn’t able to find a culprit.

There was one possibility left. And this was stress. The emotional stress of being in a less familiar environment, being away from me, and dealing with the everyday happenings at daycare was quite possibly the reason for his eczema flare ups.

What types of stress triggers eczema?

  • Separation anxiety – When your child is away from you for long periods of time, it may cause them mental and emotional distress and result in their skin being more itchy.
  • The stress scratch cycle – When your child feels stressed from irritants such as clothing and dust, they may begin to scratch their skin intensely.
  • Busy schedules – Just like all of us, when schedules get more hectic, we start to feel stressed and begin to worry. Children also feel this when their routines become overloaded or changed, so it is important to maintain a more relaxed routine for your little one and sometimes choose to do less.

How can I manage my child’s stress?

There are some changes you could make which could help to lessen eczema flare ups related to stress.

Itchy skin can make sleeping well really challenging and the lack of sleep can result in your child feeling stressed, worsening eczema symptoms. To help your little one (and you) get a good night’s sleep you could try:

  • Bath time can help some children relax, especially if it is part of their known routine.
  • After the bath massage their skin using a hydrating moisturiser or oil to protect the skin from drying out and getting itchy during the night.
  • Limit the use of screen time two hours before bed time.
  • Make sure your child’s bedroom is a relaxed environment – not too hot or cold. It is also important to dress your child up in pyjamas made of cotton which is a breathable fabric and lessens the heat around the body which can cause itchiness.

Although stress may not directly cause eczema, it can increase the incidence of eczema flare ups. Just being aware of stress as a trigger for your child’s eczema can influence decisions you make about your day to day routine.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

are pets good for children who have eczema?

What type of pets are good for children who have eczema?

Can children with eczema have pets?

We all love pets, especially children. They are a great way of passing time and having fun, while at the same time helping your child learn responsibility. Choosing a family pet when your child has eczema has comes with extra considerations, this is because pet dander and other allergens or irritants can potentially trigger eczema and aggravate flare ups.

Which pets can trigger eczema?

Any animal that sheds pet dander has the potential to trigger eczema flare ups in your child. Dander is material shed from the body of various animals that have fur, hair, or feathers. You may have heard of ‘hypoallergenic pets’ being better for your eczema child, however there is no proof that these animals are better for children with allergies because all pets have the potential to transfer dander and saliva to your child.

Research on pets and eczema

Studies conducted by Epstein, which was featured in ‘The Journal of Paediatrics’ showed that dog ownership among young children who tested positive for dog allergies, decreased the risk of developing eczema when they are older. Six hundred and thirty six children at risk of developing allergies, living in Cincinnati were collected and results showed that those with dogs were less likely to develop allergies compared to those who did not own a dog.  Doctors call this the hygiene hypothesis, where the theory is that being exposed to germs when a child is young strengthens the immune system.

Although research found this data for dogs, there was not very much information on whether cats act the same way. Studies showed that children who owned a cat before the age of one, who were also tested positive for allergies, were much more likely to develop atopic eczema than those who did not have a cat. If your child is allergic to cats, living with one may make them more likely to get eczema flare ups. Experts say that more investigations need to be administered on the positives and negatives of owning different pets while you have a child with atopic eczema.

According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, eczema flare ups can worsen with triggers such as allergens and pet dander (pet saliva, urine or skin flakes), and not always just the pet’s fur. Since research is still not 100% conclusive, it may be safe to expand your options and buy a pet with no fur instead (maybe a goldfish?). You can also spend time with the pet you are considering buying and see if your child’s symptoms worsen, and then make a decision.

Tips for living with a pet

If you suspect that your pet is aggravating your child’s eczema, here are some tips to help minimise flare ups:

  • Vacuum and dust regularly to get rid of pet dander and fur, as well as any dust mites that might be roaming around
  • Keep your pet out of bedrooms
  • Wash the pet bedding routinely
  • Bathe and groom your pet regularly to get rid of allergens that may be on them. It is best to do it outside to minimise contact with your child.
  • Make sure to wash your child’s hands after they have finished playing with the pets. Regular bath time is important to cleanse the skin especially after your child has come into contact with irritants and allergens.
  • Always remember to moisturise to keep the skin soft and hydrated!

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

eczema colloidal oatmeal bath itchy dry skin

It’s just OATMEAL! How can an oatmeal bath help my child’s itchy, dry, eczema skin?

I know, I get it, and I thought the exact same thing – oatmeal is oatmeal. How is it going to help my child’s itchy, dry, eczema skin? So to satisfy my scientific pharmacist self, I started researching the clinical evidence and research available (that kept me busy for awhile!) and after those late night study sessions, I decided to jump right in. Or rather… I stepped into the oatmeal bath carefully holding my little boy and hoping with every bit of my heart and soul for something to wash away the pain of his suffering and ease my guilt.

Why can an oatmeal bath be effective for eczema and dry, itchy skin?

Naturally, the benefits of an oatmeal bath go back to science…

Research shows most of the benefits of having an oatmeal bath come from oatmeal’s chemical structure:

  • Beta-glucans hold in water and protect the skin, and may also assist in stimulating collagen production to strengthen the skin from irritation.
  • Cellulose and fibre which give oatmeal the ability to soften and moisturise the skin.
  • Phenols which have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, helping reduce irritation and itching of your child’s eczema skin.
  • Our body contains prostaglandins which cause blood vessels to dilate, resulting in inflamed, irritated skin that can be prone to infection by bacteria and other microorganisms.
  • Colloidal oatmeal lowers the levels of prostaglandins, resulting in repaired barrier function and calmed skin.
  • Saponins, which are compounds found mainly in grains, and this ingredient gives colloidal oatmeal exceptional cleansing qualities to wash the skin and also take away any triggers sitting on the skin’s surface which can cause irritation and lead to infection.

Is using oatmeal for eczema and itchy, dry skin a new thing?

No! Oatmeal has been used for hundreds of years to soothe itchy and irritated skin. The oldest oat grains were found in Egypt in about 2000 BC and was introduced to North America at the beginning of the 17th century. Colloidal oatmeal started to be used for cosmetic benefits in facial masks as well as for cleansing and relieving itching. In the mid 1900s, colloidal oatmeal became ready to use for skin care and in 2003, the US FDA approved it as a product that can relieve skin irritation and itching.

What new evidence is around to suggest colloidal oatmeal might be effective for my child’s eczema?

Studies have been conducted on colloidal oatmeal, as it has been used for centuries as a topical treatment for a range of skin conditions, including eczema. Extracts of colloidal oatmeal were made with numerous solvents and tested in antioxidant and anti-inflammatory assays. A blind study was also carried out with 29 healthy females who displayed mild to moderate itch with dry skin on their lower legs. After treatment with colloidal oatmeal, results showed significant clinical improvements in skin dryness, roughness and the magnitude of itchiness. These results provided evidence that colloidal oatmeal does contribute to anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, benefiting the skin, and may be used to treat the symptoms of eczema (Reynertson KA et al., 2018; PubMed 2018).

In a double blind, active-controlled study researchers aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 1% colloidal oatmeal cream, compared to prescription creams in children with eczema. A variety of ages (ranging from 6 months to 18 years old) were randomised to colloidal oatmeal and prescription cream. The effectiveness of these products was tested using the Eczema Area and Severity Index (EASI) scores, as well as the Investigator’s Global Atopic Dermatitis Assessment (IGADA) scores. The EASI scores showed that prescription cream was not superior to colloidal oatmeal. It was concluded that 1% oatmeal cream was equally effective and safe as the prescription cream, in the treatment of mild-moderate eczema in children (Lisante Et Al., 2017; Medline, 2018).

Another double-blind, randomised, controlled study was conducted by researches where colloidal oatmeal was applied for 15 minutes as an open patch test, and under a patch for 24-48 hours. Results showed no sign of an allergic reaction. In a 2-week, single-blinded study of patients with Fitzpatrick skin types IV-VI, a remarkable improvement in skin brightness was seen within the first day, and continued throughout the study period. These results concluded that using the moisturiser containing colloidal oatmeal twice daily had great improvements in alleviating symptoms of irritated skin (Nebus et al., 2004).

But what is colloidal oatmeal?

When we hear oatmeal bath, it may sound like having a bath with breakfast cereal, but it is not quite what we think.  Oatmeal is ground into a fine powder and boiled, making it into a colloid, which is a solution of very small particles suspended in warm water, and because it has been finely ground, it remains evenly dispersed and does not sink to the bottom. This well mixed oatmeal is called colloidal oatmeal. Colloidal oatmeal binds to the skin and forms a protective barrier which helps to lock in moisture, as well as ease inflammation, it also cleanses the skin.

Where can I find colloidal oatmeal to help my child’s eczema and itchy, dry skin?

Our itchy baby co. products contain colloidal oatmeal. A regular skincare routine of bathing and moisturising your child every day can lead to healthy and happy skin.We recommend dissolving two to three spoonfuls of our natural oatmeal bath soak in a lukewarm bath every day and applying our oatmeal and coconut moisturiser within two minutes of taking your child out of the bath.  You can find a range of natural skincare products containing oatmeal oatmeal at itchy baby co.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

References:

Lisante, T., Nunez, C., and Zhang, P. (2017). Efficacy and safety of an over-the-counter 1% colloidal oatmeal cream in the management of mild to moderate atopic dermatitis in children: a double blind, randomised, active-controlled study. Journal of Dermatological Treatment 28: 659-667
Renertson, KA. et al. (2015). Anti-inflammatory activities of colloidal oatmeal (Avena sativa) contribute to the effectiveness of oats in treatment of itch associated with dry skin.  J Drugs Dermatol. 14 (1): 43-48. PubMed-NCBI
Nebus J, et al. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2004;50:P77.
Gibson L, et al. (2003) Origin, history, and uses of oat (Avena sativa) and wheat (Triticum aestivum).

helping my child's dry skin

My child has dry skin – what can I do to keep their skin healthy?

Dry skin is an uncomfortable condition where the skin becomes itchy, scaly and starts to crack. Looking after your child’s skin may take a lot of time and can be stressful, especially seeing them in pain from scratching so much. It can happen for a number of reasons, but it is important to remember that managing dry skin by using effective skincare products in a regular skincare routine will help keep your child’s skin healthy. With some children dry skin can be harmless, but for others if the skin is not regularly moisturised, it can trigger skin irritation, itchy skin and eczema.

What can cause my child’s skin to become dry?
  • Cold weather – Skin tends to be driest in winter, because of the dry air, cold temperatures and low humidity, making dry skin and eczema flare ups common. Using heaters and fireplaces during winter may also contribute to low humidity and drying of the skin.
  • Hot weather – During hot weather, your child will sweat more to try and regulate their body temperature, causing water loss from their body and drying out their skin. This can break down the skin’s natural barrier, making it harder to keep bacteria and irritants away from the body and increase the risk of infection.
  • Harsh soaps and detergents – Many available soaps, detergents and shampoos contain harsh chemicals that help remove oil from the skin, but can also strip the skin of moisture.

Where on the body is dry skin common?

Most dry skin is caused by environmental factors such as weather, low humidity and having showers and baths where the water is too hot. Hands, arms, and legs are the most common areas of the body to become dry. In most instances, dry skin can be managed using an intensive moisturiser.

What does dry skin look like?

  • Flaking, itching, peeling and scaling of the skin
  • Dullness and redness of the skin
  • Rough patches on the skin
  • Grey, ashy skin with cracks that if left untreated can bleed

What can I do to help my child’s skin?

Using a hydrating as well as cleansing bath soak to add moisture into your child’s skin during bath time will add moisture into the skin and coat the skin to prevent water loss. When you take your child out of the bath gently pat their skin without drying it completely. Then moisturise immediately while their skin is still a bit damp. Moisturise their skin again in the morning to protect it during the day.  Choosing to moisturise their skin with an ointment, like our itchy baby co. moisturiser, rather than a cream or lotion will work better for dry skin. This is because it stays on the skin for longer to lock in hydration and stop water escaping from the skin’s surface.

 

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love and care from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

Does iron deficiency cause eczema?

Can iron deficiency cause itchy skin and trigger eczema?

Is there a link between Eczema and Iron deficiency?

We like to keep on top of what’s happening in eczema research and share anything that might help to manage our children’s eczema and itchy, dry skin. New research has shown there is a link between Eczema and Iron deficiency. Being deficient in iron means there is not enough iron to pump oxygen through our blood stream around the body. Researchers have also reported that children with eczema are at higher risk for iron deficiency compared to children who don’t have eczema.

How do we get iron into our body?

At birth, babies have enough iron stores for several months unless the mother had low iron during pregnancy. The best source of iron is red meat, iron-fortified breakfast cereals or bread, eggs, nuts and seeds, and dried fruit such as apricot and raisins. It is important to maintain your child’s diet especially if they have eczema and low levels of iron in their body (excluding food allergies, of course).

Symptoms of Iron deficiency

Some symptoms caused by iron deficiency can be:

  • pale skin
  • tiredness
  • unexplained, easy bruising and bleeding from cuts
  • nosebleeds and bleeding gums

How do I know if my child is iron deficient?

If you suspect your child is iron deficient, speak to your doctor who is likely to recommend a blood test.

Treatment of iron deficiency

Iron deficiency is usually treated by taking an iron supplement, something your doctor or pharmacist might recommend if a blood test confirms your child low in iron.

It is important to keep in mind that being iron deficient does not necessarily mean your child will develop eczema, or that every child who has eczema is iron deficient.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

Why does my child have baby acne

My child has baby acne – what is it and how do I treat it?

If your baby has tiny red pimples on their face or body, they might have baby acne. Baby acne mostly appears on the cheeks, chin or forehead, but might also affect the eyelids and chest. This common skin condition affects more than 30 percent of newborns.

What causes baby acne?

There is no clear answer for what causes baby acne. Experts often point to the hormones transferred between the mother to the baby in the final weeks of pregnancy, but as yet there are no definite answers or explanations. You might find rough fabrics, or using a particular washing detergent linked to your little one experiencing skin irritation. Also, the pores in a baby’s skin are not yet fully developed which makes it easier targets for dirt and irritants to be trapped in their skin, which can also result in bumps and pimples.

What does baby acne look like? Could it be eczema?

It can be quite difficult to tell the difference between baby acne and other skin conditions that commonly affect young children such as eczema. Eczema and other skin conditions are generally red and inflamed with areas of dry and cracked skin which may cause the baby a great deal of distress and severe itchiness. Baby acne is generally bumpier and not necessarily itchy. Both conditions commonly appear at a very young age, however, baby acne usually clears up within a short period of time. Eczema on the other hand, can persist well into childhood and adulthood and needs a regular skincare routine to keep the skin hydrated and strengthen the skin’s barrier to avoid eczema flare ups.

How can I treat my baby’s acne?

Baby acne will usually disappear without treatment but it is important to wash your baby’s face regularly with warm water as it is gentle and soothing. Make sure to use a soft cloth and a baby bath soak to very gently wash dirt and irritants away. It is important to avoid scrubbing, pinching or squeezing the acne which can further irritate their skin.

Some babies can have acne that persists for several weeks, in which case you should consult your doctor to investigate the possibility of eczema.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

managing eczema and other skin rashes

Differences between eczema and other skin rashes?

Children can be affected by many different skin rashes, whether it is a common rash or a skin condition like eczema. There are also several different types of eczema such as atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis and nummular eczema which can complicate understanding what signs and symptoms to look out for when looking at skin rashes.

Generally children who have eczema often have irritated, itchy and red skin on different parts of the body. Eczema flare-ups can happen anywhere on the body and the most common breakout areas are on the face, the hands and feet, as well as the inside of the elbows and behind the knees. 

While eczema and other skin rashes inflame the skin and have similar symptoms, they are quite different in other ways. Here are some common skin conditions and how they differ from eczema:

Differences between skin rashes: psoriasis and eczema

Both psoriasis and eczema rashes are red, scaly and dry, but there are important differences. Psoriasis can be thick and sometimes covered with white scales and the skin becomes very itchy and scaly. The skin remains dry and eventually flakes off. Psoriasis is generally triggered by infection, skin injury or side effects from medication and is more likely to be on the back of your child’s elbow and the front of the knees. Eczema on the other hand is usually triggered by the environment such as dust, allergens and weather change and can be seen on the inside of the arms and back of the knees.  

Differences between hives and eczema

Hives are pink or red itchy rashes, and look like blotches or raised red lumps on the skin. When hives first start to appear, they can be mistaken for mosquito bites. They can be caused by a number of reasons such as allergic reactions, food and insects, exposure to sunlight as well as viral or bacterial infections, and can appear anywhere on your body. Most cases of hives are known as acute and go away within a few hours, or sometimes a few days or weeks. Hives are generally not due to allergy and they can be effectively treated with a antihistamine.

Differences between cradle cap and eczema

Cradle cap is a skin condition that most commonly affects babies under three months. It is a form of dermatitis which causes the oil glands in the skin to become inflamed. This inflammation causes the thick, yellow crusts. It generally stops after the baby is about three months old because at this age the oil glands become inactive until puberty. If your baby has signs of cradle cap after three months it might be eczema which is affecting the scalp.

Managing your child’s rashes for healthy skin

A healthy skin barrier is important for managing most skin conditions and the best way to keep your child’s skin healthy is by adding moisture to the skin to help prevent dryness and itchiness which can also help to strengthen the skin’s barrier to prevent allergens and irritants inflaming the skin.  Always keep the skin as moisturised as possible by maintaining your child’s regular skin care routine. If your child has a rash and you are unsure what type of rash it is, see your doctor to ensure you have the right management plan.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

managing eczema questions for your doctor

Questions to ask your doctor about managing eczema

When we go to the doctors about managing eczema, we usually expect our GP to ask questions about symptoms of our child’s eczema and lifestyle behaviours. However, it is also helpful to know what questions you, as a parent can ask your doctor when your child has eczema. Being proactive and engaging in a conversation with your doctor will help expand your knowledge of this skin condition and assist you in understanding what treatment are available to help you with managing eczema . The health of your child is important to both you and your doctor, so keeping the lines of communication open will allow your doctor to help you and your family develop an appropriate eczema skin care treatment plan and reduce the impact eczema can have on your child and family.

How can I prepare for my child’s visit to the doctor about managing eczema?

It is a good idea to prepare before going in to the doctor’s appointment as it will allow you to get the most out of your visit and leave better equipped to manage your child’s eczema. Researching eczema beforehand can help you understand how eczema can affect your child and give you an idea of what you would like to know from your doctor.

It is also useful to keep a record of your child’s eczema in terms of flare ups, what they have been eating, or whether there have been any lifestyle changes triggering eczema. Sharing this information with your doctor, as well as how you are already managing eczema will help you develop an eczema management plan. Be prepared and download our eczema management resource so you finish your consultation with a documented plan on how to manage your child’s eczema.

What questions should I  ask my child’s doctor about managing eczema?

We should keep in mind whatever triggers our little one’s eczema the most, may be different to someone else with eczema and therefore you might be asking more specific and individual questions depending on your child’s symptoms.

Here are some questions to ask your doctor to help you with managing eczema:

  • What type of eczema does my child have?
  • Does my child also have psoriasis?
  • How severe is my child’s eczema?
  • What should I be looking out for in terms of flare ups?
  • What should I do when a flare up happens?
  • Will my child’s eczema go away?
  • Will my child be assessed for asthma, hayfever?
  • Does diet affect my child’s eczema?
  • Will food and allergy testing help?
  • What should I be doing on a daily basis to help manage my child’s eczema?
  • Are there specialists I should consider seeing, such as a dermatologist?

Managing eczema always involves a daily skincare routine  to ensure the skin is nourished and hydrated.  Step one of our pharmacist developed itchy baby co. skincare routine involves giving your child a daily bath with our bath soak to keep their skin hydrated and clean from irritants. Our colloidal oatmeal bath soaks leave a film on the skin to keep moisture in and stop hydration escaping from the skin’s surface. They have moisturising, anti-inflammatory and anti-itch properties.

Step two involves rubbing our long lasting moisturiser into your child’s skin immediately after the bath, then at least twice more throughout the day. Our moisturiser melts into the skin, going deep into the skin’s layers to help prevent dryness and have a long lasting effect on the skin’s protective barrier.

Step three pays extra attention to areas of the body which are commonly affected by eczema, such as the face, using our face mask, and the scalp, using our scalp oil. These products can be used on any area of the body which needs more intensive hydration.

Natural, pharmacist products to help you target your child’s eczema can be found in our itchy baby co. shop.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

 

eczema and the gut

How does gut health affect eczema?

The gastrointestinal system, or the gut does more than absorb nutrients from our food. This system of digestive organs, which includes the mouth, oesophagus, stomach, rectum, small and large intestine, as well as the liver, pancreas and gallbladder, makes up 70% of your body’s immune system.

The important role of the gastrointestinal system is to act as a communication centre to and from the brain to fight against diseases. When the system is working well, it acts as a barrier to allow nutrients to pass but still protect against foreign pathogens. That is why the health of your child’s gut is so important as it could affect their overall immune system which is said to be linked to eczema.

Is eczema linked to gut bacteria?

Scientists from the University of Turku, Finland have discovered that kids who have eczema have a lot more bacteria in their guts than kids who not have this skin condition. They observed children with and without eczema to compare gut bacteria, and results showed that infants at 18 months who have eczema, had different amounts of bacteria, than those without eczema.

What food to eat and what to avoid for a healthy eczema gut?

The microorganisms living in the gut contain a huge number of good and bad bacteria. It is very important to keep the good bacteria in balance so the gut can work well.  Certain foods such as sugary, junk food, processed foods and also medications such as antibiotics and topical steroid creams can have a negative effect on the balance of your child’s gut bacteria so be mindful of your child’s diet as gut inflammation may trigger eczema flare ups.

Common foods that can help with eczema are fatty fish, yoghurt, soft cheeses, fruits and vegetables packed with antioxidants such as strawberries, rock melon and kiwi. Foods containing quercetin such as broccoli, kale, apples and cherries are also good for your eczema child because they have natural anti-inflammatory and anti-histamine properties.

How does gut inflammation trigger eczema?

When your child’s body has too much bad bacteria, inflammation happens and this results in a fever. Inflammation is good for getting rid of harmful bacteria but too much inflammation can weaken the walls of your child’s gut lining and create holes which we call a ‘leaky’ gut. Bad bacteria can then enter these holes and into blood stream, causing infections. Our skin is the body’s largest elimination organ which means when the bacteria is being wiped out an eczema flare up can happen.

What are the symptoms of a leaky gut?

Not everyone will have the same symptoms so it is important to keep an eye out for how your child reacts to certain foods, especially processed or sugary. Some of the common symptoms are:

  • Gas and bloating
  • Diarrhea or constipation
  • Stomach aches especially after eating
  • Skin rashes
  • Inflammatory bowel disease

Can probiotics help with gut health and eczema?

Probiotics are live bacteria and yeasts which can help with gut-related problems. Probiotic supplements are usually given in powder form to children, by mixing with food. They are being considered more and more for children with eczema and allergies as they can help build a strong and healthy immune system that can better withstand eczema triggers and allergies.

The most well-known probiotic rich food is yogurt which contains live cultures. Other fermented foods like sauerkraut, miso, sourdough bread and soft cheeses also contain probiotics.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.

 

dairy products and eczema

Can dairy products and dairy proteins cause eczema?

If your child has an allergy to dairy products, this can be a food-related trigger for eczema symptoms. Food allergies happen when the body’s immune system responds abnormally to certain foods. In children who have eczema, this abnormal reaction can mean a flare up of their eczema symptoms, but this does not mean that by avoiding dairy products they will no longer have eczema.

According to the Australasian society of Clinical immunology and allergy (ASCIA)  about 1 in 50 Australian and New Zealand infants (approximately 2%) are allergic to cow’s milk and other dairy products

What is cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA)?

Most people who are allergic to cow’s milk will be told they have cow’s milk protein allergy (CMPA) and will also be allergic to other animal milks such as goat’s milk and sheep’s milk and products that are made from these milks. This is because the proteins which are in cow’s milk can be the same proteins in other animal milks.

For these people with dairy allergy (CMPA) it is really important to read all labelling carefully to avoid cow’s milk, other animal milks and products made from these, unless advised otherwise by your doctor.

Is eczema directly linked to dairy intolerance?

Children who are known to be intolerant to dairy products are more likely to have eczema and other allergies such as asthma or hay fever. Dairy intolerance is not necessarily directly linked with eczema but both are more likely to occur in children with allergies. This could be because people with eczema are said to have an abnormally responsive immune system. Although dairy can be a trigger for eczema, removing it from your child’s diet may carry nutritional risks so speak with your doctor to make sure your child will continue to meet their nutritional requirements.

How do I know if my child has a dairy allergy?

If your child has eczema there is a higher chance they also have food allergies. Speak to your doctor about the best way to assess your child for food allergies and managing their food allergies.

How can I manage my child’s eczema if they have a dairy allergy?

It is essential to stick to your child’s eczema skin care maintenance routine to best manage your child’s eczema. Our itchy baby co. natural oatmeal bath soak and natural oatmeal bath soak with marshmallow root do not contain dairy proteins. Our moisturiser, scalp oil and face mask also do not contain dairy proteins.

Although animal milks for those who are not allergic can have a moisturising, nourishing and hydrating effect on the skin, if your child is allergic to dairy avoid using cows milk and other animal milks and read labelling carefully.

All parents of children who have allergies should see their doctor to discuss their individual allergy action plan  so you know what to do if your child has a reaction and how best to try to avoid it.

This blog post was brought to you and your family with love from Julia and the itchy baby co. team x.

Disclaimer: Information provided is of a general nature only, and you should always consult your medical professional.